Student Learning Support

Embedding learning support in your courses

Learning and study skills support for students is imperative to ensure engagement with course material and effective learning. It should never be assumed that students have the skills and knowledge to complete assessment tasks, know where to go for advice, or how to navigate technologies.

When developing your course, consider embedding learning support resources and links to support services to assist students in achieving a quality learning experience. It is important to embed this information as part of your course design and development, regardless of delivery mode, to give students the maximum opportunity to succeed – not just as a service to direct them to if they are struggling. Review the suggestions below based on your student cohort.

Higher education programs

Course support

Ensure your students are aware of who their course coordinator is, and any other staff involved with teaching the course. This is particularly important for online courses where face-to-face introductions are not available. Students need to visualise who their tutors are either through photo images with contact details in the course Moodle shell or a short introductory video that has clear instructions on when and how they can contact teaching staff for questions and support.

Refer to the BOLD Learning and Teaching Practices: Focus Area 01 for a list of minimum course expectations.

Embedded academic resources: Workshops and online resources

It should never be assumed that because students have gained entry to a tertiary course, that they have the skills to research academic databases, or write an academic paper. Our students come from a variety of education backgrounds and experiences and, therefore, have a variety of literacy levels and study skills capabilities.

Regardless of where a student is along their tertiary journey, academic support resources are paramount in enhancing student success. Learning Skills Advisers (LSAs) can assist with embedding academic literacy support in any course to help develop your students’ academic skills, so they can engage with course content and complete their assessments effectively. Academic staff can contact LSAs to book face-to-face or online workshops and targeted online resources. For more information about embedding academic resources into your course, visit the Embedding academic resources page or go directly to the LASS support Booking form.

Learning support services

There is a range of learning support programs and services at Federation University that students can access to enhance their study skills. The Study Help tab in Moodle includes a link to most of these services, but below are links you can refer students to from your course Moodle shell or course descriptor:

  • FedReady - University preparation program that prepares students for university and academic study prior to semester.
  • ASK – Online and on-campus drop-in service delivered by Student Academic Leaders, who provide answers to any question about university life and how to study.
  • Peer Assisted Study Sessions [PASS] – Study sessions facilitated by experienced students
  • FedCite – Online referencing tool to support students with understanding citation conventions
  • Studiosity – 24/7 online tutoring and assignment support
  • Library services – Support with research skills and referencing
  • Plagiarism – Resources to support student academic integrity

Learning support referrals

If you have identified a student in your course, who is struggling with specific academic skills or study in general, you can refer them directly to a Learning Skills Adviser (LSA) for individual support.

Learning technology support

Students have a varying array of digital literacy skills when starting university. We cannot assume that a particular generation, age or educational background will have had better exposure to varying educational technologies. Thus it is important that students are provided with opportunities to develop confidence with using the various university technology platforms and are given ample instructions and support when required to use them to complete an assessment.

Refer your students to the Online Study Hub for resources on how to use the different university technologies. 
Refer to the BOLD Learning and Teaching Practices: Focus Area 04 for a list of minimum course expectations around course resources.

TAFE programs

LLN support

If you have identified a student in your course, who is struggling with specific learning, literacy, numeracy skills, you can email the TAFE Study Support team tafelearningsupport@federation.edu.au, or encourage your students to book a tutor.

General student support

If you have identified a student in your course who may be struggling or having a tough time and need a hand to work things out, we can support you and help you to connect with resources including:

  • Academic support
  • Health and wellbeing
  • Housing support
  • Drug and alcohol resources
  • Financial and scholarship information
  • Internal services
  • External resources

Refer them to the Federation TAFE Ready support services section, where they can contact a TAFE Student Support Officer.

Learning technology support

Students have a varying array of digital literacy skills when starting university. It cannot be assumed that a particular generation, age or educational background will have a better exposure to varying technologies used in education. Thus it is important that students are provided with opportunities to develop confidence with using the various university technology platforms and are given ample instructions and support that when required to use them to complete an assessment.

Refer your students to the Federation TAFE Ready, or book a TAFE computer skills classes session (run by the library) for your students.

Academic Integrity Module (AIM)

Higher education and TAFE students are now expected to complete AIM, a requirement of Academic Board, to develop knowledge around how to act with integrity during university studies. This interactive learning module focuses on three specific areas:

  • Part 1. What is academic integrity?
  • Part 2. How do I practice academic integrity?
  • Part 3. What is academic misconduct?

Students are automatically enrolled in AIM once they commence their studies and are restricted from submitting their first assignment type task until they complete it.

It should be noted that completing AIM does not guarantee that incidents of academic misconduct will disappear. It is essential that you continue to model academic integrity in your teaching and make explicit your expectations around citing evidence, while providing opportunities for students to practice citation conventions where relevant. It is also recommended that you become familiar with AIM content yourself, so you can incorporate AIM content into your own curriculum where needed.

For more information on how to embed AIM content into your course content, please contact the AIM Coordinator via the AIM Moodle shell (accessible via the Study Help tab in Moodle) to be enrolled in AIM and download the Resource for Teaching Staff for more ideas.