Maintaining academic integrity

Academic integrity is behaving honestly and respectfully in our academic endeavours.   We demonstrate honesty in our study and publications by producing our own, original work and by correctly acknowledging when we use the work of others to inform ours. Academic integrity is also about being fair. It is being responsible for our own learning, our own work, and having the courage to do the work we need to achieve the outcome we desire.

At Federation University, it is "recognised that academic integrity is essential to excellence...” and “is the honest and respectful engagement with the scholarships of learning, teaching, research and community. It is an essential moral code to be upheld by the academic community inclusive of academic/teaching staff and students”

(Federation University Academic Integrity Policy , 2017, pp. 1-2).

The majority of tertiary institutions have adopt resources and tools under the more proactive, learner-focused term of 'academic integrity' rather than the more punitive 'teacher-centred' term of plagiarism detection. For example, many academic lecturers misinterpret or misuse online text matching software programs such as Turnitin, as plagiarism detection tools for teachers, rather than as text-matching tools to assist students improve their academic writing.  So it is important to promote integrity in the academic arena, rather than focus on the punishment. The wider academic community is built on shared values and norms of behaviour, including honesty, fairness and responsibility. Academic integrity means putting those values into practice by being honest in the academic work students do at university, being fair to others, and taking responsibility for learning.

Make your students aware of academic integrity by talking to them during class and referring them to FedUni’s Academic Integrity website.


Academic Integrity Module (AIM)

The Academic Integrity Module (AIM) was developed in Moodle, to provide students with self-paced interactive information and activities aligned to TEQSA’s guidelines for academic integrity. AIM covers the following seven areas and was piloted by selected students in Semester 1, 2018, with great success:

  1. Plagiarism and failures of correct acknowledgement practice
  2. Contract cheating or paying for another person to prepare an assignment
  3. Submitting (for assessment or review) work prepared by another person
  4. Collusion, such as copying of other peoples’ work
  5. All forms of cheating in exams
  6. Offering or accepting bribes (money or sexual or other favours), e.g. for admission or for grades, and
  7. Fabrication or falsification of information

AIMis now ready for all students to use via self-enrolment, and will take approximately 30 minutes to complete.  Options include:

  • Embed a link from your Semester 2, 2018 course directly to AIM via the Moodle site
  • Advise your students to access the AIM via the Moodle Menu Bar or Moodle Slider (on their myCourses dashboard).

Contact your School’s CLIPP Learning Designer or Learning Skills Advisor to discuss the potential use of this module in addressing your students’ academic integrity learning needs.


Student resources

In order to support students maintain academic integrity in all areas of learning and assessment, the following resources are available for reference or embedding within course materials:

  • Study Skills website – Online resources to support assessment, referencing and avoiding plagiarism.
  • Referencing workshops and resources – Learning Skills Advisors and/or Library staff are available to facilitate a face-to-face workshops, lectures or tutorials on all facets of referencing and also provide resources that can be embedded within course Moodle site.

Contact your School’s CLIPP Learning Designer or Learning Skills Advisor to discuss the resources that will best suit your students’ academic integrity learning needs.

Suspecting Plagiarism

Plagiarism, either intentional or unintentional is a practice which runs counter to the University’s values of effort and excellence and integrity. There is an expectation that students will prepare and submit work which is their own and acknowledges the work of others.

In the event that you suspect a student has plagiarised within their assessment task, please access the following Federation University documents to support your approach to dealing with this situation:

Contact your School’s Associate Dean of Teaching Quality or Program Leader to discuss your School’s process for investigating suspected plagiarism in student work.


Resources

Text

  • Biggs, J. & Tang, C. (2011). Teaching for quality learning at university (4th ed.). New York: Open University Press.
  • Race, P. (2015). The lecturer’s toolkit (4th ed.). Oxon, UK: Routledge.

FedUni policies and guidelines

Assistance

  • Contact your School’s Associate Dean of Teaching Quality or Program Leader to discuss your School’s process for investigating suspected plagiarism in student work.
  • Contact your School’s CLIPP Learning Designer or Learning Skills Advisor to discuss the resources that will best suit your students’ academic integrity learning needs.