School of Health and Life Sciences

Preston, Sarah (Dr)

Phone: +61353276880
Email: sj.preston@federation.edu.au
Room: Building Y, room 143
Position: Lecturer and researching academic
Discipline: Animal health

Qualifications

  • B. Sci (Honours) Monash University
  • PhD (Immunology and Parasitology), Monash University

Teaching areas

  • Immunology
  • Animal health
  • Biology

Professional associations

  • Australian Society for parasitology

Research interests/projects

Anthelmintic resistance in small ruminants

Gastrointestinal worms are one of the biggest constraints to the small ruminant livestock industry. Chemical control (anthelmintics/drenches) are the primary form of control and with the over-reliance of these drugs worms resistant to these chemicals are rapidly increasing. This project aims to survey Victorian sheep producers for the anthelmintic resistance history and understand husbandry practices that either delay or increase the development of anthelmintic resistance. This project is currently looking for an interested third year student research project or Honours student to help complete the project.

PPID and parasite burden in equines

Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) is the most common endocrine disease in equines. Approximately 20% of aged equines are affected by PPID and advances in veterinary knowledge is increasing equine longevity and the incidence of PPID increases along with the rising proportion of aged equines. Reduced immune function is a commonly reported characteristic of PPID but some areas are lacking comprehensive study. In particular, PPID equines may have increased susceptibility to gastrointestinal worms. This project aims to determine if PPID horses are more susceptible to worm infections and determine the underlying mechanism of reduced immune function. Currently a PhD student is working on this project however we are interested in any third year student research project or Honours student to help complete the project.

Germs and Worms

Anthelmintic application has been the method of choice for the control of parasitic nematode infections, however, frequent and incorrect use of these drugs has resulted in anthelmintic widespread resistance. Effective novel solutions, anthelmintics continue to be the main method employed to control parasitic infestations. Symbiotic bacteria can affect the host in a variety of ways including development, provision of nutrition, reproduction, and provide defence and immunity against environmental threats. Understanding the types of symbiotic bacteria that parasitic worms harbour and how they interplay with the survival of the worms may provide novel control strategies. This project is currently looking for an interested third year student research project or Honours student to help complete the project.

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