School of Arts

Graham Hannaford

grahamhannaford@students.federation.edu.au

"A Good Sheep Run. An investigation of how some letters in the Scottish press described the colony of New South Wales with the potential to influence decisions on emigration to Australia"

Abstract

This thesis undertakes detailed textual analysis of letters and items of ephemera which appeared in Scottish newspapers between 1820 and 1850, mostly originating in the colony of New South Wales and not previously investigated as a consolidated body of material. The letters originate from a variety of classes of migrant across the social spectrum.

Bio

Graham Hannaford lives in Canberra. He has worked in the Australian Public Service including a period as Vice Consul in the Australian Embassy in Rome; in 1985 he served as the Defence Adviser to the Australian delegation to the Third Review Conference of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty in Geneva. In 2015 he became the first Australian to graduate with a Master of Letters degree in history from the University of the Highlands and Islands. He holds a BA from the University of New England and studied Viking archaeology for one semester (on line) with the University of Gotland.

Journal articles

"The 1845 New Poor Law for Scotland: A Fundamental Change", Journal of the Sydney Society for Scottish History, Vol. XVII, 2018

Each of the following items appeared in https://historylinksdornoch.wordpress.com/

"Jacobites, dirks, and hair-breadth escapes" (Posted on February 20,2013) - an account of the invasion of Dunrobin Castle during the 1745 Jacobite rebellion

"Poverty and Poor Relief" (Posted on June 10, 2013)

"The Mysteries of Croick Church" (Posted on December 17, 2014) – an infamous episode in the Highland clearances

"A Man of Letters" (Posted on March 14, 2016) – exploring the links between Golspie Scotland and Golspie New South Wales

"The shipping news" (Posted on 5 April 2018) - updating the information on the emigrant ship Asia whose passengers' fates had been previously unknown

Conference paper

“Shall we go – what do the newspapers say?”, Australian Historical Association annual conference, July 2018