Philip Keys

Position: Lecturer in Teaching and Learning

Location: Berwick Campus

Phone: 03 5327 9902

Email: pkeys@federation.edu.au

Qualifications:

PhD. in Education, 2004 (Queensland University of Technology), Grad Cert. in Higher Education, 2015 (Australian Catholic University), Grad. Dip Teach (Primary), 1988 (Brisbane College of Advance Education), Master of Management in Educational Management, 1983 Bachelor of Science in Education, 1981 (University of the Philippines).

Biography

Over a sixteen-year period Phil has served full time as researcher and senior lecturer in teacher education at four different types of tertiary institutions within Australia, QUT, CDU, BIITE, and ACU. Each of these institutions have provided a broad and rich experience in higher education from a large urban university to a regional university to an Indigenous only Institution and a large urban university with a Catholic ethos.

He is a qualified and experienced classroom teacher and has been involved in education for the past thirty years.  In addition to teaching, he has been extensively involved in school based curriculum development and management for both private and public schools in the role of Deputy Principal and Principal.

His professional training is in primary education, educational management and in 2004 completed a PhD in education at Queensland University of Technology. Since then he has successfully published his research and obtained research grants.

His research and publication is in the field of Teacher Knowledge - teachers' beliefs and theories. The research investigates the impact of these beliefs and practices have within the learning space, whether that be in a classroom, or a lecture forum, in a fully online mode or as a blended mode.

His role in CLIPP is to enable and support fellow colleagues in the continual professional growth and development of their learning and teaching practice.

Publications

Keys, P.M. (2010a, May). Cultural safety in the science classroom: Creating a safe learning environment for Indigenous students. Paper presented at the International Journal of Arts and Sciences Conference, Cambridge, Massachusetts,

Keys, P. M. (2008b, December). Teaching Indigenous students science. Paper presented at the Australian Association for Research in Education, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

Keys, P.M. (2008c, November). Teacher knowledge in an Indigenous science classroom: A case study of a non-Indigenous teacher’s beliefs and practices. Paper presented at the New Zealand Association for Research in Education, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

Keys, P.M.(2008d, November). Early career scientists influencing students’ attitudes towards science. Paper presented at the New Zealand Association for Research in Education, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

Keys, P.M. (2008e, July). Trainee scientists influencing teacher practice in science classes. A paper presented at the conference proceedings for the Paris International conference on Education, Economy and Society, Paris.

Keys, P.M. (2008f, January). Teaching Indigenous students science. A keynote and workshop presented at the Australian Government Summer School for Teachers, Flinders University, South Australia.

Keys, P.M. (2008g). Empowering teachers in school and university partnership. Learning Communities: International Journal of Learning in Social Contexts, 1, 53–67. World Wide Web: http://www.cdu.edu.au/ehs/lrg/journal.html

Keys, P.M. (2008h). The role of early career scientists working in the classroom. Teaching Science: The Journal of the Australian Science Teachers’ Association, 55 (3) 49 –53.

Keys, P.M. (2008i). Meet an early career scientist. Teaching Science: The Journal of the Australian Science Teachers’ Association, 55 (3) 59.

Keys, P.M. (2007j). A knowledge filter model for observing and facilitating change in teachers’ beliefs. Journal of Educational Change, 8(1) 41-60.

Keys, P.M. (2006k) Tutoring and Mentoring Students: Making a difference in science education.[DVD]. Darwin Australia: Charles Darwin University Produced by Exposure Productions. – An Australian School Innovation in Science, Technology and Mathematics project, funded by the Australian Government Department of Education, Science, technology and Mathematics Teaching program.

Keys, P.M. & Watters, J.J., (2006, April). Transforming pre-service teacher knowledge in science education through multimedia and ICT. Paper presented at the National Association of Research in Science Teaching, San Francisco.

Keys, P. M. (2005) Are teachers walking the walk or just talking the talk in science education? Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice, 11(5), 499-516.

Keys, P.M. & Spiers, H. (2006, July) Exploring the issues of school and university partnerships in science education. Paper presented at the Australian Science Education Association, Canberra.

Keys, P.M. & Spiers, H. (2006, April) Peer tutoring and mentoring in science for indigenous and non –indigenous students in Darwin. Paper presented at the Science Teachers Association of Northern Territory, Darwin.

Keys, P. M. (2004, April). Are teachers walking the walk or just talking the talk in science education? Paper presented at the National Association of Research in Science Teaching, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Watters, J. J., Keys, P. M., Rogers, G. A., Gibson, K., Alargic, M., & Doyle, C. (2004). From Kansas to Queensland: Global learning and internationalisation in preservice elementary teacher education. Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Education Research Association Conference, San Diego.

Keys, P. M. (2003, March). Teachers bending the science curriculum. Paper presented at the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Philadelphia. (Nominated for the 2004 NARST Outstanding Paper Award)

Keys, P.M. (2003) The science curriculum running the gauntlet of teacher beliefs. Paper presented at the Australasian Science Education Research Association, Melbourne, Vic, Australia

Keys, P.M., (2003) Teachers’ beliefs. Curriculum Leadership Journal Newsletter - Volume 1, Number 33.

Keys, P. M. (2001). Educational Criticism: Where does it fit within the traditions of research? In P. Singh & E. McWilliam (Eds.), Designing educational research: Theories, methods, and practices (pp. 275-284). Flaxton, QLD Australia: Post Pressed.

Keys, P. M. (2000, December). Developing a good science syllabus for an optimistic future: A classroom teacher's perspective. Paper presented at the Australian Association for Research in Education, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Dissertation

Keys, P. M. (2003). Primary and secondary teachers shaping the science curriculum: The influence of teacher knowledge. Unpublished Dissertation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.