Faculty of Health

Dr George Van Doorn

Phone: (03) 5122 6746

Email: george.vandoorn@federation.edu.au

Room: 2W281 Churchill, Gippsland

Discipline: Psychology

Qualifications

PhD, BA(Hons)

Teaching areas

Forensic Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Introduction to Psychology, Research supervision

Research interests

George's main research interest is in exploring perception. He has conducted several experiments exploring how we perceive temperature via self- and externally-generated movements, how vision and touch work together in virtual reality, how colour and temperature interact (e.g., hot is associated with red), and the influence of colours on the perception of taste (e.g., work with Charles Spence on how the colour of the mug can influence the perception of the taste of coffee). Recently, George has merged his interest in touch with illusions – which are useful in that they can tell us about errors in perception, and thus about perception itself. For example, he has become particularly interested in a theory developed largely by Karl Friston (i.e., prediction error minimisation [PEM]). George and colleagues recently generated a body-swapping illusion and had people either tickle themselves or be tickled by someone else, and much of his current work is devoted to exploring PEM by incorporating sensory integration, self- and externally-generated movements, and various illusions.

Supervised projects

Ebrahim Oshni Alvandi (2013) – PhD – Emotional Content of Different Modes of Telecounselling

Stephanie Castanon (2013) – PhD - Impacts of Celebrity and Mass Media on Body Image

Alex De Foe (2012) – PhD – Out of Body Experiences

Kwan Choi (2011) – PhD – Community Policing in South Korea and the UK

Ruth McFarlane (2010) – PhD – Why People Leave Religions

Michael Notaras (2012) – BA(Hons) – Haptic Working Memory

Megan Pump (2012) - BA(Hons) – Motivation in Mass Sporting Events

William Schmidt (2011) – BA(Hon) – Neural Networks and Traumatic Brain Injury

Alex De Foe (2011) – PostGradDip(Research) - Out of Body Experiences

Cecilia Castanon (2011) – PostGradDip(Research) – Body Image

Shannon Driscoll (2011) – PostGradDip(Research) – Stochastic Resonance and Schizophrenia

Publications

2015

  1. Van Doorn, G.H., Colonna-Dashwood, M., Hudd-Baillie, R., & Spence, C. (2015). Latte art influences both the expected and rated value of milk-based coffee drinks. Journal of Sensory Studies, 30(4), 305-315.
  2. Van Doorn, G.H., Howell, J., & Hohwy, J. (2015). Attenuated self-tickle sensation even under trajectory perturbation. Consciousness and Cognition, 36, 147-153. (IF: 2.03).

2014

  1. Van Doorn, G.H., Hohwy, J., & Symmons, M. (2014). Can you tickle yourself if you swap bodies with somebody else? Consciousness and Cognition, 23, 1-11 (IF: 2.03).
  2. Ho, H-N., Van Doorn, G.H., Kawabe, T., Watanabe, J., & Spence, C. (2014). Colour-temperature correspondences: When reactions to thermal stimuli are influenced by colour. PLoS ONE , 9(3), e91854. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0091854 (IF: 3.73).
  3. Van Doorn, G., Wuillemin, D., & Spence, C. (in press). Does the colour of the mug influence the taste of the coffee? Flavour.

2013

  1. De Foe, A., Van Doorn, G.H., & Symmons, M. (2013). Floating sensations prior to sleep and out of body experiences. Journal of Parapsychology, 77(2), 271-280.
  2. Seno, T., & Van Doorn, G.H. (2013). Illusory upward self-motion results in a decrease in perceived room temperature. Psychology (PSYCH), 4(11), 823-826.
  3. Van Doorn, G.H., Richardson, B.L., & Symmons, M.A. (2013). Touch can be as accurate as passively-guided kinaesthesis in raised line length perception. Multisensory Research, 26(5), 417-428.
  4. Van Doorn, G.H. (2013). Can we really talk to the dead? A reply to Ferreira (2013). Australian Journal of Parapsychology, 13(1), 57-62.
  5. VanDoorn, G.H., & Eklund, A.A. (2013). Face to facebook: Social media and the learning and teaching potential of symmetrical, sychronous communication, Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 10(1), 1-14 (http://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol10/iss1/6/).
  6. Van Doorn, G.H., Richardson, B.L., & Wuillemin, D.B. (2013). Fitting a bionic eye to the body: How haptics can help. International Journal of Adaptive and Autonomous Communication Systems, 6(4), 377-390.
  7. Howell, J., Van Doorn, G.H., & Symmons, M. (2013). A reverse horizontal-vertical illusion? Auditory length perception and its relevance to virtual environments. 2013 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, 257-260.
  8. Van Doorn, G.H., & Symmons, M.A. (2013). Biases in visuo-haptic matching of curvature. IEEE World Haptics Conference 2013, 14 April 2013 to 18 April 2013, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc, Piscataway NJ USA, pp. 549-553.
  9. Howell, J., Symmons, M.A., & Van Doorn, G.H. (2013). Using traditional horizontal-vertical illusion figures and single lines to directly compare haptic and vision. IEEE World Haptics Conference 2013, 14 April 2013 to 18 April 2013, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc, Piscataway NJ USA, pp. 673-676.

2012

  1. De Foe, A., Van Doorn, G.H., & Symmons, M. (2012). Research note: Induced out-of-body experiences are associated with a sensation of leaving the body. Australian Journal of Parapsychology, 12(2), 177-185.
  2. Van Doorn, G.H., Hohwy, J., & Symmons, M.A. (2012). Capture of kinesthesis by a competing cutaneous input. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, 74(7), 1539-1551.
  3. De Foe, A., Van Doorn, G.H., & Symmons, M.A. (2012). Auditory hallucinations predict likelihood of out-of-body experiences. Australian Journal of Parapsychology, 12(1), 59-68.
  4. Van Doorn, G.H., Seno, T., & Symmons, M. (2012). On the inability of supraliminal tactile stimuli to influence illusory self-motion. In C. Magnusson (Ed.), Proceedings from The Seventh International Workshop on Haptic and Audio Interaction Design (pp. 21-23), Berlin, Springer.
  5. Van Doorn, G.H., Seno, T., & Symmons, M. (2012). Visual vection is not facilitated by supraliminal vibrotactile stimulation. In C. Magnusson (Ed.), Proceedings from The Seventh International Workshop on Haptic and Audio Interaction Design (pp. 24-27), Berlin, Springer.
  6. Van Doorn, G.H., Hohwy, J., Symmons, M.A., & Howell, J. (2012). The more they do, the less they know: Cutaneous capture of kinesthesis? Proceedings of Haptics 2012, 171-182, IEEE Computer Society.
  1. Van Doorn, G.H., Richardson, B.L., Symmons, M.A., & Howell, J. (2012). Cutaneous inputs yield judgments of line length that are equal to, or better than, those based on kinesthetic inputs. In P. Isokoski & J. Springare (Eds.), EuroHaptics 2012 (Part II, pp. 25-30), Berlin, Springer-Verlag.
  2. Van Doorn, G.H., Dubaj, V., Wuillemin, D.B., Richardson, B.L., & Symmons, M.A. (2012). Cognitive load can explain differences in active and passive touch. In P. Isokoski & J. Springare (Eds.), EuroHaptics 2012 (Part I, pp. 91-102), Berlin, Springer-Verlag.
  3. Howell, J.L., Symmons, M.A., & Van Doorn, G.H. (2012). The misperception of length in vision, haptics and audition. Proceedings from EuroHaptics 2012

2011

  1. Van Doorn, G.H., Symmons, M.A., & Richardson, B.L. (2011). A precision-of-information explanation of sensory dominance. International Journal of Advanced Intelligence Paradigms, 3(3/4), 240-256.
  2. Van Doorn, G.H., Symmons, M.A., & Richardson, B.L. (2011). Red is no warmer than blue: A challenge to the semantic coding hypothesis. i-Perception, 2(8), 349.